Ginger Molasses Cookies



Ingredients

2 cups flour

1 stick butter

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup molasses

1 egg

2 tsp baking soda

1 1/2 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp cardamom

2 tsp ginger

1 tsp nutmeg

1/4 tsp salt
Recipe

Preheat the oven to 375.

Cream sugar and butter together. Add molasses and egg. Mix well.

Add soda and spices. Mix well.

Gradually add flour and mix until all combined.

Form dough into 1 inch balls and roll in sugar.

Bake for 8-10 minutes.

Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies


cranberry oatmeal cookieIngredients

  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup walnuts
  • 1/2 cup shortening
  • 1-1/4 cups sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup molasses
  • 2 cups quick-cooking oats
  • 1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon cardamom
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 teaspoons ginger
  1. In a large bowl, cream shortening and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add vanilla. Beat in molasses. Combine the oats, flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, cardamom, and ginger; gradually add to the creamed mixture and mix well. Stir in cranberries and walnuts.
  2. Drop by tablespoonfuls 2 in. apart onto lightly greased baking sheets. Bake at 350° for 12-14 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove to wire racks to cool. Yield: about 5 dozen.

Christmas Stollen


 

 

Ingredients

For the Fruit:

  • 1 cup mixed candied fruit
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 3 tablespoons dark rum or orange juice

For the Sponge:

  • 1 scant tablespoon or 1 (1/4-ounce) package active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup warm water (about 110 degrees F)
  • 2/3 cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

For the Dough:

  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1 large egg,  beaten
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground mace
  • 1/2 cup chopped almonds, toasted
  • 3 to 4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • Oil, for coating bowl

For the Filling:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar

For the Topping:

  • 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar

Directions

Prepare Fruit: Combine the mixed fruit, raisins, and rum or juice. Cover and set aside. Shake or stir the mixture every so often to coat the fruit with the rum or juice.

 

Prepare Sponge: In a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast in the water to soften. Heat the milk to 110 degrees F and add it to the yeast along with the honey and 1 cup flour. Cover the sponge with plastic wrap and let rise until light and full of bubbles, about 30 minutes.

 

By Hand: Add the fruit mixture, honey, egg, butter, zest, salt, mace, almonds, and 2 cups of the flour to the sponge. Beat vigorously for 2 minutes. Gradually add the remaining flour 1/4 cup at a time until the dough begins to pull away from the side of the bowl. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface. Knead, adding flour a little at a time, until the dough is smooth and elastic.

 

By Mixer: In the mixer bowl, add the fruit mixture, honey, egg, butter, zest, salt, mace, almonds, and 2 cups of the flour to the sponge. Using the paddle, beat the mixture on medium low speed for 2 minutes. Gradually add the remaining flour 1/4 cup at a time until the dough begins to pull away from the side of the bowl. Change to the dough hook. Continue to add flour 1 tablespoon at a time until the dough just begins to clean the bowl. Knead 4 to 5 minutes on medium-low.

 

First rise: Put the dough in an oiled bowl and turn to coat the entire ball of dough with oil. Cover with a tightly woven towel and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

 

Shape and Fill: Turn the dough out onto a lightly oiled work surface. For 1 large loaf, roll the dough into a 9 by 13-inch oval. For 2 loaves, divided the dough in half and roll each half into a 7 by 9-inch oval. Brush the melted butter over the top of the oval(s). Combine the cinnamon and granulated sugar and sprinkle over one lengthwise half of the oval(s). Fold the dough in half lengthwise and carefully lift the bread(s) onto a parchment-lined or well-greased baking sheet. Press lightly on the folded side to help the loaf keep its shape during rising and baking.

 

Second rise: Cover with a tightly woven towel and let rise for 45 minutes.

 

Preheat oven: About 10 minutes before baking, preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

 

Bake and cool: Bake for 25 minutes until the internal temperature of the bread reaches 190 degrees F. Immediately remove from the baking sheet and place on a rack to cool.

 

To serve: Sprinkle heavily with confectioners’ sugar just before serving.

 

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Molasses Sugar Cookies


 
 Molasses Sugar Cookies
 
recipe image
 
 
 
 
Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups shortening
2 cups white sugar
1/2 cup molasses
2 eggs
4 cups all-purpose flour
4 teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon salt
Directions:
1. Melt the shortening in a large pan on the stove, and cool.
2. Add sugar, eggs, and molasses, beat well.
3. In a separate bowl, sift dry ingredients together and add to the pan. Mix well and chill 3 hours or overnight.
4. Form into walnut-size balls. Roll in granulated sugar. Place on greased cookie sheet about 2 inches apart.
5. Bake at 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) for 8-10 minutes.
6. Store in an airtight container to keep from getting overly crisp. If they do lose their softness, an easy way to restore it is to place one slice of fresh bread in the container with the cookies for a couple of hours or overnight and they will be soft again!

Posole


Posole

Serves 10-12 (hearty servings)

Ingredients

5 lbs. Pork shoulder
2 Large cans white hominy
10-12 Dried red chiles (Usually found in the Mexican isle. The more the spicier!)
1 clove garlic
Oregano
2 tbs. Olive oil
Salt
Fresh cracked black pepper

Preparation

Cut pork into bite sized pieces. Heat olive oil in large stock pot.
Sear pork and season with salt and black pepper. Add enough water to cover the pork and simmer.
Slice open the dried chiles and remove all seeds and veins (It doesn’t matter if they break into pieces).

In a small pot, boil the chiles with just enough water to cover. Once tender, about 10-15 min., put chiles in blender, water and all, add one clove of garlic and 1 tsp oregano.
Blend until smooth consistency.
Add the chile paste to the simmering pork. Then add the hominy, include the water from the can. If necessary add water to desired consistency.

Salt and pepper to taste.
Simmer until pork is tender and juicy and broth has thickened slightly.

Cooking Time: 1.5 hours +
Serving Suggestions
Chopped onion, cilantro and/or cabbage can be added when serving the dish. Also, lemon slices and tostadas are often served.

History

Posole is a spicy corn stew made by many Mexican families.
Corn and chiles were basic foods for the Native American’s and Mexican’s ancestors. These crops became a staple in their cuisine. Posole was one such dish that stems from these basic foods and has been eaten for centuries.

Traditional Cooking and Serving Methods

This is just one recipe for Posole. Although there are many
others, this recipe is an authentic Mexican form of the stew. Many different recipes for posole exist on the Interent. Different cultures within Mexican culture offer different recipes and Americanized versions of the recipe can be found as well. The recipes vary in many different ways. Posole can be adjusted for the amount of heat that is wanted in the stew (add more or less chiles to taste). Some families leave the seeds in the chiles, but this makes the stew very spicy, so be prepared. Different meats can be used as well, such as chicken. Even the chiles can vary depending on the region,
red chiles in some areas, and green chiles in others. The basic concept to posole is that a corn kernel is used to make the stew and a spicy broth is added.

Posole

Posole is processed from corn and is made by soaking the kernels
in some form of water. Different sources suggest different ways to soften the corn. They include limewater and calcium hydroxide. This process removes the hard shell of the kernel. Then the kernels become big and puffy from  the excess water.
Posole is not the same as hominy, although hominy is often used to make  the stew. One source suggests that hominy is blander than real posole, but posole can be harder to find. Also, the red kernels that are used are harder and give the stew a different texture. The hominy makes the stew easier to make as well, since the corn kernels are already softened.

Christmas Stollen


Long before the Romans occupied parts of Germany, special breads were prepared for the winter solstice that were rich in dried or preserved fruit. Historians have traced Christollen, Christ’s stollen, back to about the year 1400 in Dresden, Germany. The first stollen consisted of only flour, oats and water, as required by church doctrine, but without butter and milk, it was quite tasteless. Ernst of Saxony and his brother Albrecht requested of the Pope that the ban on butter and milk during the Advent season be lifted. His Eminence replied in what is known as the famous “butter letter,” that milk and butter could be used to bake stollen with a clear conscience and God’s blessing for a small fee. Originally stollen was called Striezel or Struzel, which referred to a braided shape — a large oval folded in half with tapered ends — said to represent the Baby Jesus wrapped in swaddling clothing. Around 1560 it became custom that the bakers of Dresden give their king, the ruler of Saxony, two 36-pound stollens as a Christmas gift. It took eight master bakers and eight journeymen to carry the bread to the palace safely. This custom was continued for almost 200 years. In 1730 Augustus the Strong, the electoral prince of Saxony and the King of Poland, asked the Baker’s Guild of Dresden to bake a giant stollen for the farewell dinner of the Zeithain “campement.” The 1.8-ton stollen was a true showpiece and fed over 24,000 guests. To commemorate this event, a Stollenfest is held each December in Dresden. The bread for the present-day Stollenfest weighs 2 tons and measures approximately 4 yards long. Each year the stollen is paraded through the market square, then sliced and sold to the public, with the proceeds supporting local charities. Although there is a basic recipe for making the original Dresden Christollen, each master baker, each village and each home has its own secret recipe passed down from one generation to the next. There are probably as many recipes for stollen as there are home bakers. The commercial production of Dresden stollen is carefully licensed and regulated to ensure quality and authenticity. Authentic German stollen is usually sprinkled heavily with confectioners’ sugar prior to serving.

Ingredients
For the Fruit:
1 cup mixed candied fruit
1 cup raisins
3 tablespoons orange juice

For the Sponge:
1 scant tablespoon or 1 (1/4-ounce) package active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (about 110 degrees F)
2/3 cup milk
1 teaspoon honey
1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

For the Dough:
1/3 cup honey
1 large egg, beaten
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground mace
1/2 cup chopped almonds, toasted
3 to 4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
Oil, for coating bowl

For the Filling:
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
3 tablespoons granulated sugar

For the Topping:
1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar

Directions
Prepare Fruit: Combine the mixed fruit, raisins, and rum. Cover and set aside. Shake or stir the mixture every so often to coat the fruit with the rum.

Prepare Sponge: In a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast in the water to soften. Heat the milk to 110 degrees F and add it to the yeast along with the honey and 1 cup flour. Cover the sponge with plastic wrap and let rise until light and full of bubbles, about 30 minutes.

By Hand: Add the fruit mixture, honey, egg, butter, zest, salt, mace, almonds, and 2 cups of the flour to the sponge. Beat vigorously for 2 minutes. Gradually add the remaining flour 1/4 cup at a time until the dough begins to pull away from the side of the bowl. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface. Knead, adding flour a little at a time, until the dough is smooth and elastic.

By Mixer: In the mixer bowl, add the fruit mixture, honey, egg, butter, zest, salt, mace, almonds, and 2 cups of the flour to the sponge. Using the paddle, beat the mixture on medium low speed for 2 minutes. Gradually add the remaining flour 1/4 cup at a time until the dough begins to pull away from the side of the bowl. Change to the dough hook. Continue to add flour 1 tablespoon at a time until the dough just begins to clean the bowl. Knead 4 to 5 minutes on medium-low.

First rise: Put the dough in an oiled bowl and turn to coat the entire ball of dough with oil. Cover with a tightly woven towel and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

Shape and Fill: Turn the dough out onto a lightly oiled work surface. For 1 large loaf, roll the dough into a 9 by 13-inch oval. For 2 loaves, divided the dough in half and roll each half into a 7 by 9-inch oval. Brush the melted butter over the top of the oval(s). Combine the cinnamon and granulated sugar and sprinkle over one lengthwise half of the oval(s). Fold the dough in half lengthwise and carefully lift the bread(s) onto a parchment-lined or well-greased baking sheet. Press lightly on the folded side to help the loaf keep its shape during rising and baking.

Second rise: Cover with a tightly woven towel and let rise for 45 minutes.

Preheat oven: About 10 minutes before baking, preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake and cool: Bake for 25 minutes until the internal temperature of the bread reaches 190 degrees F. Immediately remove from the baking sheet and place on a rack to cool.

To serve: Sprinkle heavily with confectioners’ sugar just before serving.

Danish Pecan Kringle


DANISH PECAN KRINGLE
For the pastry:
2 cups all purpose flour
1 Tablespoon sugar
½ teaspoon salt
½ cup cold butter
1 package active dry yeast
¼ cup warm water (110 – 115 degrees)
½ cup warm milk (110 – 115 degrees)
1 egg, beaten
1 egg white, lightly beaten
For the filling:
1 ½ cups chopped pecans
1 cup packed brown sugar
dash of salt
1/3 cup butter, softened
For the icing:
1 cup confectioner’s sugar
1 to 2 Tablespoons water
2 Tablespoons chopped pecans
Combine flour, sugar and salt in a large bowl, cut in butter until mixture resembles fine crumbs.  Dissolve yeast in warm water; stir into flour mixture with warm milk and egg.  Beat until smooth (dough will be very soft).  Cover and chill at least 2 hours, but no more than 24 hours.  Combine filing ingredients in small bowl before forming kringles.  Lightly flour a pastry board to prevent dough from sticking.  Divide dough in half, cover and return remaining half to refrigerator while forming first kringle.  Roll dough into a 6 x 18 inch rectangle.  Spread a 3 inch strip in the center with half of the beaten egg white.  Spread pecan filling over the egg white.  Fold one side of the dough over the filling, then fold over the other side, overlapping to cover filling.  Pinch dough to close the fold.  Pick up kringle carefully and arrange in an oval on a greased baking sheet, seam side down, pinching ends together to meet.  Cover with a towel and repeat for second kringle.  Cover kringles and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes (until slight indentation remains if you press gently with finger).  Bake in 350 degree oven for 20 to 25 minutes or until golden brown.  While baking, beat powdered sugar with water to desired icing consistency.  Cool kringles for 10 minutes, then drizzle powdered sugar icing on kringles and sprinkle with chopped pecans.  Cut in wedges to serve.